BG - Bunge Limited Archives

Company Information

Bunge Limited, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in agriculture and food businesses worldwide. It operates through five segments: Agribusiness, Sugar and Bioenergy, Edible Oil Products, Milling Products, and Fertilizer. The Agribusiness segment is involved in the purchase, storage, transport, processing, and sale of agricultural commodities and commodity products, such as oilseeds and grains, primarily soybeans, rapeseed or canola, sunflower seed, wheat, and corn to animal feed manufacturers, wheat and corn millers, other oilseed processors, livestock producers, third party edible oil processing companies, and biodiesel industries. The Sugar and Bioenergy segment produces and sells sugar and ethanol; trades and merchandises sugar; and generates electricity from burning sugarcane bagasse. As of December 31, 2013, this segment had a total installed capacity of approximately 314 megawatts. The Edible Oil Products segment offers packaged and bulk oils, shortenings, margarines, mayonnaise, sauces, pastes, condiments, seasonings, processed tomato products, and other products to baked goods companies, snack food producers, restaurant chains, foodservice distributors, and other food manufacturers, as well as grocery chains, wholesalers, distributors, and other retailers. The Milling Products segment produces and sells various wheat flours and bakery mixes; and corn milling products, primarily dry milled corn meals, flours, and grits, soy-fortified corn meals, corn-soy blend products, and other products, as well as sells packaged rice products. The Fertilizer segment produces, blends, and distributes nitrogen, phosphate, and potash fertilizer formulations, including phosphate based liquid and solid nitrogen fertilizers; single super phosphate; and ammonia and urea products. Bunge Limited was founded in 1818 and is headquartered in White Plains, New York.

9 Agriculture Stocks to Profit from Global Food Shortage

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Why Agriculture Stocks will Outperform? The inflation in the food prices is set to continue globally. The demand is rising faster than the supply can keep pace and in 2007 and 2008 there were riots in 60 countries due to run up in the prices of corn, wheat and soybeans. There are many drivers behind […]